Monday, November 14, 2011

Monday items: Bell on gold; Tamny on the euro; Moore on Gingrich.

From Roll Call, Jeff Bell argues the gold standard will lead to political success for candidates that advocate it.

The NY Sun suggests US Rep. Ron Paul (TX) has important points to make on monetary policy and foreign policy.

At Forbes, John Tamny explains that even if Greece left the eurozone, its debt would still be in euros.

On The WSJ, Stephen Moore discusses proposals to increase internet taxes:


From The WSJ, Moore notes Newt Gingrich’s rise.

The WSJ reports a huge drop in US visa applicants.

At International Liberty, Dan Mitchell responds to Alan Blinder’s flat tax criticism.

In The WSJ, Mary O’Grady notes international advice for Costa Rica to raise taxes:
Since January, the government of President Laura Chinchilla of the National Liberation Party (PLN) has been pushing a package of sharp tax increases to fund a spike in government spending.

The IDB [Inter-American Development Bank] seems to approve. A statement released from its country representative on Friday said that the bank "does not advocate a specific tax burden or tax policy." But IDB tax expert Alberto Barreix has twice visited the country this year to endorse the Chinchilla plan, calling it "a heck of a tax reform." He has also said that Costa Rica needs a tax burden similar to Argentina's.
At The American, James Pethokoukis features two depressing charts on unemployment.

From the archives, GI Joe presents a relevant tale of monetary destruction with gold as a replacement:


On Slate, David Greenberg explores the Republican obsession with Calvin Coolidge.

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