Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Tuesday items: Multiples responses to the Obama/Buffett tax hike argument; Tamny on bank bailouts; The WSJ chides Romney's China stance.

AP rebuts the President’s (and Warren Buffett’s) claims regarding tax rates paid by the rich.

The WSJ critiques the Obama/Buffett analysis.

On NRO, Larry Kudlow bashes the President’s tax attack.

From The Fiscal Times, Steve Forbes opposes tax increases on the rich.

At The WSJ, Paul Gigot comments on the President’s tax proposal:


At RCM, John Tamny notes that three years after the bailouts, the banking system is weaker.

On Café Hayek, Don Boudreaux echoes Douglas Irwin’s claim that Smoot-Hawley played a minor role in the Great Depression.

In The WSJ, Bret Stephens predicts the eurozone’s break up.

Alhambra Investments foresees a breakup of the euro.

The WSJ chides Mitt Romney for his rhetoric on China’s currency.

London’s Chatham House features documents from its 1929-31 conference on The International Gold Problem.

Sanjuktamoorthy.com explains Robert Mundell’s desire for a single world currency.

In The Washington Times, Richard Rahn notes that elevated inflation combined with ultra-low interest rates means a huge tax on savers.

On Bloomberg, Caroline Baum reports the Fed’s upcoming replay of Operation Twist.

On The Kudlow Report, James Pethokoukis debates the President’s low poll numbers:


In The NYT, Bruce Bartlett advocates rolling back tax code expenditures.

From First Trust, Brian Wesbury argues a new recession is unlikely.

At The Weekly Standard, Jonathan V. Last suggests China’s One Child Policy will prevent it becoming a great nation.

The Huffington Post reports Newt Gingrich will unveil a Contract with America 2012. No word as to whether currency and exchange rate reform will be on the agenda.

In The NYT, conservative Keynesian Ben Stein supports for higher taxes on the rich.

At COAL, Paul Krugman claims the current crisis is caused by a failure of demand, but that supply-side problems may be emerging.

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