Monday, August 22, 2011

Monday items: Mundell on the euro/dollar; Ip and Roberts debate Keynesian stimulus; Goldman sees two economies in America.

From Central Banking, Robert Mundell provides a fascinating overview of the euro and the dollar situation.

At Forbes, John Tamny suggests politicians should do less.

The WSJ notes a week’s worth of unhelpful economic messages from the Obama Administration:
Monday: "Warren Buffett right about taxes, says Obama." The week began with a one-two tax punch from Warren Buffett and President Obama. The Omaha stock-picker wrote an op-ed begging Congress to raise taxes on millions of Americans who make less than he does, and the President used the first stop of his bus tour, in Cannon Falls, Minnesota, to agree.

"I put a deal before the Speaker of the House, John Boehner, that would have solved this problem," Mr. Obama said, "and he walked away because his belief was we can't ask anything of millionaires and billionaires and big corporations in order to close our deficit." So America's main job creators are still on notice that a tax increase is in their future in 2013, if not sooner.

In The Washington Post, Greg Ip argues Republican skepticism of easy money and Keynesian spending is the new voodoo economics.

At Café Hayek, Russ Roberts fires back.

On Asia Times, David Goldman suggests there are two American economies.

From last week on The Kudlow Report, Jimmy Pethokoukis discusses the President’s growth plans:

From Bloomberg, conservative Keynesian John Taylor blames President Nixon’s wage and price controls – not the dollar's float from gold – for 1970s inflation.

In The WSJ, Harvey Golub responds to Warren Buffett’s tax-hike advocacy.

At Barron’s, Jim McTague describes Ron Paul’s economic message as gloomy.

In The WSJ, Mary Anastasia O’Grady links the Fed’s easy money to high commodity prices, which may help re-elect Argentina’s leftist government.

The Weekly Standard reports US Rep. Paul Ryan (WI) passing on a White House run.

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